What on earth are Crosnes?

What on earth are Crosnes?

17 December 2015 by Matthew Grainger

These unusual looking chaps are known as Crosnes. Paul is using them as part of the Pan Seared Stone Bass dish we are serving on New Year's Eve, as they bring a delicious, lightly sweet earthiness to a meal. Not often seen on plates, as, let's face it, they are not the most aesthetically pleasing looking of vegetable, the flavor of the stem tubers is very delicate, almost nutty, and they can be prepared similarly to Jerusalem artichokes in cooking. It is used as a vegetable, in salad compositions, but more so as a garnish. Very popular in Chinese and Japanese cuisine, the Chinese artichoke (as it is otherwise known) is primarily pickled. In particular, its tuber is a part of Osechi,a dish  cooked for celebrating the Japanese New Year .In French cooking, its cooked tuber is often served alongside dishes named japonaise or Japanese-styled.

While the plant is easy to grow, the tubers are small and very knobbly, so they are considered very difficult to clean properly. The thin skin ranges from a pale beige to ivory - white colour. The flesh underneath, is white, tender, and delicately perfumed. The tubers are harvested in the fall season in the Northern hemisphere. So, now you know!

 

These unusual looking chaps are known as Crosnes. Paul is using them as part of the Pan Seared Stone Bass dish

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